Richmond Archaeology: An Update on Shockoe Bottom and RVArchaeology

Richmond Archaeology: An Update on Shockoe Bottom and RVArchaeology

Posted by on May 26, 2014 in Research and Engagement | One Comment

  A great deal has happened since I last wrote about Archaeology, Shockoe Bottom, and the Ballpark to move our City towards a better relationship with its archaeological and cultural resources. A lot of this energy has come from the “Before It’s Too Late” Symposium held on March 29th, which generated a lot of public and ...

Before It’s Too Late: An Education Symposium on the History and Archaeology of Shockoe Bottom

Before It’s Too Late: An Education Symposium on the History and Archaeology of Shockoe Bottom

Posted by on Mar 23, 2014 in Research and Engagement | No Comments

Over the past few weeks, I have been working with a local advisory committee to put together a symposium in Richmond addressing the historical importance of Shockoe Bottom, the area where the mayor has proposed a large development project, and the archaeological implications of the project. The symposium is on Saturday, March 29th at the ...

My Next Step: The Montpelier Foundation

My Next Step: The Montpelier Foundation

Last week, I accepted a position at Montpelier as the Research Archaeologist. I’m very excited about the opportunity, and looking forward to working with Dr. Matt Reeves and the wonderful staff at Montpelier on examining the plantation home of the United States’ 4th President, James Madison. I accepted the position for many reasons: it will ...

The Integrated Plantation Landscape: SHA2014 Session

The Integrated Plantation Landscape: SHA2014 Session

This coming January, I will be taking part as a co-organizer in a session at the Society for Historical Archaeology (SHA) meetings in Quebec City, Quebec called The Intersecting Plantation Landscape II. The session revisits a number of plantation landscapes that my fellow organizers and I examined at the Society for Early Americanists (SEA) meetings ...

Why Blog?

Why Blog?

A few years ago, I was fortunate enough to participate in a wonderful session at the Society for American Archaeology organized and chaired by Colleen Morgan, everyone’s favorite archaeology blogger. In addition to being one of the first times that archaeologists got together at a conference and talked about blogging as a valid medium for ...

Digital Humanities 2013 Conference: Digital Archaeology Session

Digital Humanities 2013 Conference: Digital Archaeology Session

A month ago, I attended the Digital Humanities Conference in Lincoln, Nebraska. I was asked by Dr. Ethan Watrall to be a part of his session on Digital Archaeology, and to present on the development of the Walk Together Digital Exhibit at Historic St. Mary’s City. The session was loaded with a number of big ...

Automating my Dissertation Backup with Keyboard Maestro

Automating my Dissertation Backup with Keyboard Maestro

Posted by on Aug 21, 2013 in Dirt, Productivity | 6 Comments

One of the greatest horrors for all PhD students is the fear of losing your dissertation through some sort of computer disaster. We’ve all heard the stories, or perhaps suffered the consequences of data getting deleted accidentally or a hard drive failing. I have a number of precautions in place to make sure that if ...

Dark Sky: Predict the Weather while in the Field

Dark Sky: Predict the Weather while in the Field

One of the most difficult judgements that is made during an archaeological excavation never has to do with the ground: it always has to do with the sky. Is it going to rain? When is it going to rain? Are those dark clouds headed this way? Do we have 10 minutes until they get there, ...

On Slave and Tenant Quarters and the Importance of Naming

On Slave and Tenant Quarters and the Importance of Naming

Posted by on Jun 23, 2013 in Dirt, Research and Engagement | 6 Comments

For the past seven years, I have been conducting my dissertation research on two former slave and tenant quarter at Historic St. Mary’s City. One of the buildings, a duplex quarter, still stands, although not in its original place. Over the past year, we’ve made a number of strides towards being more public about the ...